The Lost Child II

I read an article online by Louise Behiel entitled “The Lost Child: Invisible and Unheard.” She said that the lost child, which I identify as, understands or feels the strain the family is under. As a result, they try to minimize their demands on their parents and siblings. I certainly avoided any push back my parents might have given by not asking to go to parties and other events that I knew they would not approve of. I didn’t fight for the things I really wanted. To this day, I feel somewhat guilty when I attend a number of events in close proximity of each other. Behiel said, as a result, lost children are often overlooked. This leaves them feeling lonely, rejected and isolated. The conundrum is they get what they want but that result leaves them feeling empty. The lost child spends much time doing activities such as daydreaming, fantasizing, reading, and watching television. This describes my childhood to a tee.

This article also got me thinking about another article I read, in which I learned that I was a compulsive eater. It got me wondering…does compulsive eating mean I’m feeling empty inside; that the inner child in me is starved for affection or attention. Am I denying that this exist in me because I was taught to be strong and independent? This is more eye-opening information to ponder.

Hi, I’m Liz Hawkins and I’m an Adult Child of an Alcoholic.

Reposted from MyACOALife.blogspot.com December 31, 2015

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The Never-Ending Struggle

Adult Children of Alcoholics tend to have a hard time with transitions and changes.  A sudden change of plan or anything that feels out of their control can trigger anxiety and sometimes even anger.  ACOAs thrive on routine and predictability because it makes them feel safe.

Lately, I’ve been craving for my life to slow down.  I feel like I’ve got too many balls up in the air; that there’s not enough time to do everything, and I’ve put all the pressure and responsibility on myself.  I supposed it’s my own ego telling me that the only way it’s all going to get done right, is if I’m the one that does it.

I’m finding that I have to constantly remind myself that I’m only human and it’s okay to ask for help and to say ‘no.’  The struggles of being ACOA seem never-ending.

Hi, I’m Liz Hawkins and I’m a recovering Adult Child of an Alcohol.

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ACOA takes a vacation

I missed posting last Thursday because I was on vacation in Paris, France. It was wonderful; the food, the sights, the smells, all breath-taking. But the nagging ACOA trait of difficulty having fun nearing spoiled the trip before it even got started.

I’d planned this trip back in October 2015. But as the time drew near, when my excitement should have been increasing – life happened. As you know, my brother died in June. Settling some of his affairs fell on me. At the same time, I was in the process of trying to locate a suitable assisted living residence for my 86-year old mother. While at the same time finalizing my book for publication. My anxiety levels were through the roof and with my typical ACOA trait of high-burden of responsibility, I just couldn’t get excited about Paris.

Thankfully, once I got on the plane I mentally left all by burdens behind; even if it was only for seven days. I had fun. I thought of only myself and my happiness and didn’t feel guilty about it or feel that I was being selfish. It felt good and I want more of that feeling in my everyday life.

Hi, I’m Liz Hawkins and I’m a recovering Adult Child of an Alcoholic.

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The Procrastinating Me

There is a poster that depicts a huge polar bear lying flat on the ice. The caption reads: “When I get the feeling to do something, I lie down until the feeling goes away”. This is the sign of the resigned procrastinator: broken by frustration, unable to catch up, chained by depression and sustained by the simple apathetic response, “I don’t care anymore”.

Well, I cannot say I’m that bad but my procrastination really gets on my nerves sometime. I find myself having arguments with myself, saying “you know you need to do this or that” or “if you don’t get started now you’re not going to be able to finish on time.” It’s maddening. I know procrastination must be an ACOA trait because it seems to go hand in hand with my propensity to avoid situations that I find uncomfortable or tasks the dread undertaking.

When I do prod myself to work on whatever job I’d been putting off, I find that it’s so easy for me to get distracted. I can be researching something on the Internet for a school or work project then find myself checking my Facebook page. During my continued research in ACOA characteristics, I learned that in fear-motivated procrastination, you have to try to identify the fear. Both the fear and the sources of that fear must be confronted before the behaviors expressed by procrastination can be addressed. I’m trying to get to the source of my fear so I can start dealing with my problems head on and quit procrastinating. It’s not been easy but one day at a time.

Hi, I’m Liz Hawkins and I’m a recovering Adult Child of an Alcoholic.

Modified re-post from www.myacoalife.blogspot.com 11-19-2015

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